Wednesday, August 23, 2017

Song of the Day

(22) The Dave Clark Five - Any Way You Want It. Stereo - YouTube:

Today's Vintage Ad


PaperBack



Shock!, M. C. Allen, editor, Pyramid, 1965

Thomas Meehan, R. I. P.

Playbill: He is the only creative to have written the books for three shows that ran more than 2,000 performances on Broadway: the aforementioned Annie (2,377 performances), The Producers in 2001 alongside Mel Brooks (2,502 performances), and Hairspray in 2002, which he wrote with the late Mark O’Donnell (2,642 performances). He earned Tonys for all three shows.

Bonus FFB for Wednesday: The Body Beautiful -- Bill S. Ballinger

I'm a big fan of two Bill S. Ballinger books, Portrait in Smoke and The Tooth and the Nail.  The Body Beautiful isn't like either of those.  It's a hard-boiled p.i. novel, sort of, but it has elements of the cozy, too.

The p.i. on the case is Barr Breed, and the murder is of a beautiful chorus girl whom Breed has been dating.  Someone throws a knife and kills her during the performance of a show.  There's a knife thrower in the show, and one of his knives is missing.  I don't think it's a spoiler to say that he's not the killer.  Later someone else is also killed with one of his knives. He should have kept them in a more secure place.

Breed naturally tangles with the cops, as most private-eyes do, and he's really under pressure to get the case solved.  It's pretty complicated, and the solution takes a good many pages to explain.  It involves a gathering of all the suspects and a staged explanation from Breed.  I was surprised at a couple of things, though, which was fun.  Another good thing about the book is the authenticity of all the show business material, and there's quite a bit of it.  This won't ever be my favorite Ballinger book, but it's worth a look. 

Tuesday, August 22, 2017

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

40 Classic Books & Why You Should Read Them

Song of the Day

How Phil Collins Accidentally Created the Sound That Defined 1980s Music

How Phil Collins Accidentally Created the Sound That Defined 1980s Music

I Miss the Old Days

37 Stunning Color Photos That Capture Teenage Girls in Dresses From the 1950s

Today's Vintage Ad



Time Traveler by Merriam-Webster

Time Traveler by Merriam-Webster: When was a word first used in print? You may be surprised! Enter a date below to see the words first recorded on that year.

PaperBack




Carson Bingham (Bruce Cassiday), Payola Woman, Pyramid, 1960

Formula for making a movie blockbuster trailer

Formula for making a movie blockbuster trailer

Bad Movie Night

Bad Movie Night: The Uproarious Silliness of ‘Ninja III: The Domination’

Chemo #2, New Series

I'm getting ready to head to M.D. Anderson to receive the second chemo infusion in the new series of treatments.  I sure hope this one is the magic bullet because I'm getting tired of all this stuff.  

Overlooked Movies -- This Is Elvis

Last week TCM went all out for Elvis Presley on the 40th anniversary of his death.  One movie that I hadn't seen, although I'd heard a bit about it, was This Is Elvis, a sort of documentary.  I say "sort of" because while there's a lot of great archival footage, mixed in with it are a number of reenactments.  And while it's supposedly Elvis narrating the film, it's actually Ral Donner doing his best Elvis speaking voice.  Sometimes the reenactments are obvious, as with the three different actors playing Elvis at various stages of his career, but sometimes they're not quite so obvious, as with some of the interviews supposedly conducted at various times.  I'm assuming that the B&W segments aren't reenactments, or that most of them aren't.  I could be wrong, however.

The film worked pretty well overall, I thought, and it didn't flinch from the downfall at the end of Elvis' life.  Okay, maybe it did flinch a little in not spending much time on it, but it presented it honestly.  It shows a segment of the 1968 TV special, which Judy and I watched live back then.  Both of us thought that the real Elvis was back, and I know I, for one, thought it would be a turning point in his career and life.  It was, all right, but not in the way I thought.  He managed to sustain the quality for a short while, but it was all downhill after that.  I'd recommend this film for anybody who's too young to remember Elvis and the impact he had and for nostalgic old folks like me.

***And now for a personal aside.  The only time that Judy and I saw Elvis in person was when he appeared in Abilene, Texas, on March 27, 1977.  We didn't have great seats, but I had a pair of binoculars that we shared throughout the show.  It was a great show, but afterward I told Judy that Elvis didn't look good at all.  She got upset with me because Elvis, to her, always looked good.  I was right, however.  Only a few months later he was dead.

The day the Elvis died, Judy and I were eating dinner with the kids when the news came on TV.  Judy started to cry as soon as she heard it.  I'll bet the kids still remember this, though they were small at the time.  It was a shocker, for sure.

This Is Elvis

Monday, August 21, 2017

These are slightly better than the one I took

Stunning Photos Capture the Solar Eclipse Across America

My View of Today's Eclipse


Once Again Texas Leads the Way

Texas man drinks liquid explosives after he’s busted trying to bomb Confederate statue

Two New Ones from Stark House

Stark House and its Black Gat imprint have two great new publications, both from Clifton Adams.  Here's my review, from Steve Lewis's Mystery*File of Never Say No to a Killer, which originally appeared as by Jonathan Gant:  "Adams also wrote a paperback original for the Ace Double line. He used the name Jonathan Gant, and the book is one half of D-157, Never Say No to a Killer.

"It seems to have been influenced by Horace McCoy’s Kiss Tomorrow Good-Bye, as it’s narrated by an intellectual killer and begins with an escape from a prison work gang. Roy Surratt deludes himself in much the same way that Joe Hooper and Roy Foley do, though he’s well aware that he’s far from the innocent they think themselves to be before they begin their crime sprees.

"This book has a nice twist in that it doesn’t appear to be a mystery novel until the very end, when it’s revealed that one character was indeed doing some detecting and putting the clues together. Maybe this one’s not quite in the league with the two Gold Medals, but it’s worth a read."

And here's what I added about The Desperado and A Noose for the Desperado:  "If you’re curious about Adams’s westerns, I highly recommend two of his earliest, The Desperado and A Noose for the Desperado.

 "These are dandy noir westerns with a protagonist worthy of Jim Thompson. They’re hard to find, though. They hardly ever turn up even on eBay."  

But now they're available in one handy volume, and they're top-notch reading.

10 Awful Final Roles Of Actors That Deserved Better

10 Awful Final Roles Of Actors That Deserved Better

Song of the Day

The 59 U.S. National Parks, In Photos

The 59 U.S. National Parks, In Photos  

Slideshow.

Today's Vintage Ad


The Rise of the Cow-Boys

The Rise of the Cow-Boys: In search of the real Curly Bill.

PaperBack



Theodore Sturgeon, The Synthetic Man (The Dreaming Jewels), Pyramid, 1957

The true-crime memoir

The true-crime memoir: when MFA grads and literary aspirants write true crime

I Miss the Old Days

Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis: 30 Fascinating Photographs Capture Funny Moments of the Comedy Duo in the 1940s and 1950s

Sunset 8-20-17


Brian Aldiss, R. I. P.

Brian Aldiss - Wikipedia: Brian Wilson Aldiss, OBE (/ˈɔːldɪs/; 18 August 1925 – 18 August 2017[1]) was an English writer and anthologies editor, best known for science fiction novels and short stories. His byline reads either Brian W. Aldiss or simply Brian Aldiss, except for occasional pseudonyms during the mid-1960s.

18 space suits from science fiction, from worst to best

18 space suits from science fiction, from worst to best: When has Hollywood actually gotten it (somewhat) right?

Sunday, August 20, 2017

A Review of Interest (To Me, Anyway)

Words & Music: Bill Crider, Dead, To Begin With

Jerry Lewis, R. I. P.

Hollywood Reporter: Jerry Lewis, whose irrepressible zaniness and frantic creativity vaulted him to stardom as a comic movie star who wielded unparalleled green-light power at Paramount in the 1960s, died Sunday. He was 91.  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

I Miss the Old Days

Photographs capture New York from the 1960s to the 1990s  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

10 Unconventional Facts About William Burroughs

10 Unconventional Facts About William Burroughs 

Song of the Day

‘Casey at the Bat’ Leaves a Lot of Unanswered Questions

‘Casey at the Bat’ Leaves a Lot of Unanswered Questions: Was there a Casey? Where did he strike out? Does it really matter?

Today's Vintage Ad


Colt vs. Schofield

Colt vs. Schofield: During much of the Indian Wars era, the U.S. Cavalry relied primarily on these two revolvers—each with its own peculiarities. Which one would you prefer?

PaperBack



Robert Finnegan (Paul William Ryan), The Bandaged Nude, Signet, 1957

Voyage to the Otherworld: A New Eulogy for Ray Bradbury

Voyage to the Otherworld: A New Eulogy for Ray Bradbury

Seepy Benton Could Have Solved It If He'd Tried

The Romance of Fermat's Last Theorem 

Dick Gregory, R. I. P.

Dick Gregory, civil rights activist and comedian, dead at 84: (CNN)Comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory, who broke barriers in the 1960s and became one of the first African-Americans to perform at white clubs, died Saturday.  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

I Found a Penny in the Walmart Parking Lot Last Week

Part of Henry VIII's Birthplace Discovered: Workers at London’s Old Royal Naval College were prepping the site of a new visitors center for the Painted Hall, considered the Sistine Chapel of England, when they unearthed something equally incredible: two rooms from the Palace of Placentia, reports Giles Broadbent at The Wharf.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Free for Kindle for a Limited Time

The Lone Star Express (The Bill Travis Mysteries Book 13) by [Wier, George]The Lone Star Express (The Bill Travis Mysteries Book 13) - Kindle edition by George Wier. Literature & Fiction Kindle eBooks @ Amazon.com.  In the aftermath of the death of former Texas Governor, Richard Sawyer, Bill Travis must accompany the body to its final resting place in West Texas...by train. The deadline is tight, the Old '19 is an ancient steam train that drives at a ponderously slow pace, and a quarry of ruthless and determined men are out to stop Bill and the steam-driven crew of the newly re-dubbed Lone Star Express at any and all costs. But who are they, and what do they want? It's Bill Travis in his most dangerous adventure of all time, along with a team of aging misfits who refuse to see history die and the last of the great steam behemoths of old stopped in its tracks.

She Wants to Believe!

Paris Hilton says she could've been like Princess Diana if sex tape wasn't released  

Hat tip to John Duke.

I Found a Penny in the Walmart Parking Lot Last Week

The Wreckage Of The USS Indianapolis, Missing For 72 Years, Has Just Been Found

“Plans and Revisions” by Steve Liskow

“Plans and Revisions” by Steve Liskow | Trace Evidence: Steve Liskow is the author of three mystery series, and his latest book is Hit Somebody. In 2016 he became the Black Orchid Novella Award‘s first repeat winner. You can read his winning story “Look What They’ve Done to My Song, Ma” in the current July/August 2017 issue. Here, he talks about the evolution of this story, his previous winner, and the Woody Guthrie series.

Song of the Day

(24) Boss Guitar-Duane Eddy & Rebelettes-1963-RCA Victor 47 8131.wmv - YouTube:

This week’s tabloids

Earth faces comet catastrophe, in this week’s tabloids: J. Edgar Hoover killed President Kennedy, O.J. Simpson aims to murder Kardashian matriarch Kris Jenner, and JonBenet Ramsey’s babysitter tells all, in this week’s reality-divorced tabloids.

Today's Vintage Ad


Remembering Sci-Fi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback

Fifty Years Later, Remembering Sci-Fi Pioneer Hugo Gernsback: Looking Back on a Man Who Was Always Looking Forward

PaperBack



Roy Booth, Girl Stowaway, Intimate Novel, 1954

Roadside Dinosaurs

Documenting America’s Long, Venerable Tradition of Roadside Dinosaurs

I Miss the Old Days

53 Behind-the-Scenes Photos of Marilyn Monroe Filming 'River of No Return' in 1954

Karl Ove Knausgaard: By the Book

Karl Ove Knausgaard: By the Book: The author of the six-volume autobiographical novel “My Struggle” and, most recently, “Autumn” steers clear of crime fiction: “I only read crime novels when I’m depressed, so I try to avoid them.”

Forgotten Hits: August 19th

Forgotten Hits: August 19th  

Two Chicago surveys included.

Will the Persecution Never End?

Remembering Lindsay Lohan and Paris Hilton’s Reign of Hollywood Terror: The dream of the aughts is alive at a new art exhibit in Brooklyn. Behold the boozy, breakdown-fueled world of “Nicole Richie’s 2007 Memorial Day BBQ.”

Friday, August 18, 2017

Alan Hale Jr. "the Skipper"

Alan Hale Jr. "the Skipper" - Neatorama

Song of the Day

(23) Dear One by Larry Finnegan 1962 - YouTube:

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

Five H.P. Lovecraft Stories You Should Actually Read in 2017

Today's Vintage Ad

I Miss the Old Days

The Body Beautiful – 47 Glamorous Photos of Marie McDonald in the 1940s: Marie McDonald (1923-1965) was a leggy, voluptuous blonde starlet who pursued her career with a vengeance but found little reward in the end. Her parents divorced when Marie was just 6 years old. Marie's mother remarried and the new family moved to Yonkers, New York, where she attended Roosevelt High School and excelled in piano and wrote for the school newspaper.

PaperBack



Dorine B. Clark, Gutter Star, Intimate Novel, 1954

Dino Update

'Most bizarre dinosaur ever found' is missing evolutionary link

Piker

Shelf life: novelist Hanya Yanagihara on living with 12,000 books | Books

FFB: Turn on the Heat -- Erle Stanley Gardner

Now that Hard  Case Crime has issued the heretofore unpublished first novel in Erle Stanley Gardner's Cool and Lam series (The Knife Slipped), the next logical step was to reprint the second book in the series, Turn on the Heat.  I'd never read this one before, so it was as obscure to me as the unpublished novel (Turn on the Heat has been out of physical print for more than 50 years), and I'm grateful to Hard Case for releasing it and calling my attention it.  Cool and Lam are fun to read about, and Turn on the Heat has them in fine form.

The plot's almost impossible for me to lay out in simple form, but I can say that it begins with the disappearance of a woman twenty years before the action starts.  Now a lot of people want to find her, and one of them hires Cool and Lam to do the work for him.   The search takes Donald to the small town from which the woman disappeared, where he meets an attractive young woman, tangles with a crooked (and tough and mean) cop, gets mixed up in a lot of local politics, and generally stirs things up.  Murder ensues.

As usual, people and things are not always what they seem, and Lam put himself in and Cool in some tricky legal situations, or maybe I should say near-illegal situations, with Cool worrying about jail but liking the idea of a big payoff so much that the risks are worth it.

And the payoff does come, both figuratively and literally, as Lam ties everything together, and you see that Cool, who reminds us every twenty pages or so how smart he is, is right. 

I hope Hard Case plans to reissue more of the Cool and Lam books, as they've as much fun as ever.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

The Page 69 Test: "Dead, to Begin With"

The Page 69 Test: "Dead, to Begin With"

Fast Times at Ridgemont High at 35

Fast Times at Ridgemont High: Cameron Crowe on Film’s 35th Anniversary 

Song of the Day

(22) Bonnie Tyler - It's A Heartache (VIDEO) (Best Quality!) - YouTube:

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

The Scariest 25 Minutes on U.S. Television

Today's Vintage Ad


Yes, Dr Pepper Is Included

10 Snack Foods Originally Sold as Medicines 

PaperBack



Simms Albert, Pound of Flesh, Intimate Novel, 1953

I Miss the Old Days

1970s stock photos were even more awkward than today

I suspect the same goes for books

Millennials don’t really care about classic movies: A new study finds that less than a quarter of millennials have watched a film from start to finish that was made back in the 1940s or 50s and only a third have seen one from the 1960s.

How WWII Saved 'The Great Gatsby' From Obscurity

How WWII Saved 'The Great Gatsby' From Obscurity

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Top 10 Hidden Grave Sites Found With Satellite Images

Top 10 Hidden Grave Sites Found With Satellite Images

Song of the Day

First It Was the Thin Mints Melee

Man's widow, girlfriend have brawl at funeral home during viewing

Elvis Presley: 1977 Obituary

Elvis Presley: 1977 Obituary on Anniversary of Death

Today's Vintage Ad


I Miss the Old Days

25 Beautiful Photos of Women Who Defined Rock Music in the 1960s and 1970s

On Endings -- Janet Hutchings, Editor of EQMM

ON ENDINGS | SOMETHING IS GOING TO HAPPEN: Recently I was asked to serve on a short-story panel at the Bouchercon World Mystery Convention in Toronto (October 12-15) that will attempt to provide advice to new writers on various aspects of craft. The panel’s moderator, frequent EQMM and AHMM contributor James Lincoln Warren, asked each panelist to provide a list of topics for discussion. That got me thinking about endings.

PaperBack



Bruce Manning, Off Limits, Intimate Novel, 1951

A Sports Car is Born

A Sports Car is Born: One measure of the desirability of a sports car is whether or not it has teenagers drooling over it before they’re even old enough to drive. Here’s the story of one of the most drool-worthy cars in auto history. (See how long it takes you to guess which car we’re talking about.)  

When I was a kid, our next-door neighbor was a car salesman.  I got to ride in the first one of these cars ever to appear in Mexia, Texas.

Collecting Vintage Postcards

Collecting Vintage Postcards: Postcards (sometimes spelled out in two words as "post cards") became popular at the turn of the 20th century, especially for sending short messages to friends and relatives. They were collected right from the start, and are still sought after today by collectors of pop culture, photography, advertising, wartime memorabilia, local history, and many other categories.

Bonus FFB for Wednesday: Silence -- Thomas Perry

This is a little bit of a cheat, since I don't usually write about books I don't finish, but I thought I'd make an exception just this once.  It's rare for me not to finish a book once I've started, and I never thought I wouldn't finish one by Thomas Perry, who's entertained me many times.  Silence didn't work for me, though.

I should have known it was trouble when I saw that it was well over 400 pages long with fairly small print.  I'm not a fan of long books, but Perry's such an expert at pacing, I didn't think the length would be a problem.  I was wrong.

Here's why. Perry seems to have intended this to be a character-driven thriller, which is fine, although I think thrillers are generally plot driven.  I got bogged down in all the backstories for the characters in Silence.  There's so much backstory in the first 120 pages (which is as far as I got) that there's enough material for a couple of other books.  Maybe all this stuff will pay off later in the book, but not for me.  The thing that drove me to put the book down was the lengthy backstory (eight or nine pages) of one character, who's then killed only a few pages later.  I figured enough was enough.  I'll be reading other Thomas Perry books, no question about that, but this one was a disappointment.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Writers Read: Bill Crider

Writers Read: Bill Crider: Crider's newest novel is Dead, to Begin With, the 24th Dan Rhodes Mystery. Recently I asked the author about what he was reading.

B.K. Stevens: R.I.P.

Mystery Fanfare: B.K. Stevens: R.I.P.: Such sad and unexpected news. Bonnie Stevens: R.I.P. She will be missed by so many in the mystery community. Sending sympathy to her family and friends.

The Best Trick U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves Ever Pulled on a Criminal

The Best Trick U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves Ever Pulled on a Criminal

Song of the Day

This is the first recorded version.  The Kingston Trio didn't have a hit with it, however.
(24) Let's Get Together - YouTube:

He Gets Around

Rescuers discover body in Modesto creek is Dracula  

Hat tip to Art Scott.

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

Stephen King's 10 Most Terrifying Human Villains

Today's Vintage Ad


41 Brand Names People Use as Generic Terms

41 Brand Names People Use as Generic Terms

PaperBack



Kathie Reed, Shack Woman, Intimate Novel, 1953

10 Crime-Fighting Tricks the Bad Guys Didn’t See Coming

10 Crime-Fighting Tricks the Bad Guys Didn’t See Coming

Second Glance: ‘Cop Land’

Second Glance: The Scorsese-esque Melancholy of ‘Cop Land’: James Mangold's 1997 police corruption drama boasts a jaw-dropping cast, headed up by a startlingly natural Sylvester Stallone.

Overlooked Movies: Bulldog Drummond (1929)

Bulldog Drummond was made at the very beginning of the sound era and was Ronald Colman's first talkie.  He was one of the lucky silent stars who had the right kind of voice for talkies, or for just about anything. In this movie he shows a talent for acting and a natural charm that made him a star in both silent and talking films.

This isn't true of everyone in the movie.  Some of the acting seems stuck in another era (I found Lawrence Grant as Dr. Lakington especially annoying) as do some of the film-making techniques.  Still, I enjoyed watching this.

Drummond is a demoblized officer who finds himself bored with life outside the military. He says he's too rich to work and wants excitement, so he places a newspaper ad offering his services in exchange for excitement.  He gets a lot of responses, but the one he chooses comes from Phyllis Benton (Joan Bennett), who wants him to rescue her uncle from a hospital where he's supposedly being treated for a nervous breakdown.  She believes something fishy is going on, and of course it is.  The villains, dressed throughout in evening clothes, want the uncle's signature on a paper turning his worldly goods over to them.  Drummond sets about the rescue, both helped and hindered by his friend Algy, the alleged comic relief, and by his valet.

There are escapes and pursuits and disguises, and it's all good fun up until the end when there's a gratuitous (to me) killing, in which the tone is all off.  And then there's "the circus gag," which is pretty hard to swallow.  

Many more Drummond adventures on film followed this one, but I believe that Colman was in only one more.  This movie's nearly 90 years old now, and it holds up surprisingly well for the most part, especially Colman's acting, although I doubt I could convince any whippersnappers of this.  I'm glad I watched it and recommend it for historical reasons if nothing else.

Monday, August 14, 2017

First It Was the Thin Mints Melee

Man Hit Brother With Bat Over Tacos

Top 10 Remarkable Escapes Across The Berlin Wall

Top 10 Remarkable Escapes Across The Berlin Wall

Song of the Day

(22) Ruth Brown - This Little Girl's Gone Rockin' - YouTube:

I Miss the Old Days

Before Ziggy: Rarely Seen Photographs of a Young David Bowie Posed for the Cover of His Debut Album 

Today's Vintage Ad


50 Essential Historical Fiction Books

50 Essential Historical Fiction Books: Whether or not you consider yourself a fan of historical fiction, you've heard the names Hilary Mantel, Eleanor Catton, Anthony Doerr and Kristin Hannah repeatedly over recent years. No longer dismissed as bodice-rippers rife with anachronisms or dreary textbooks dressed up in barely discernible plots, historical fiction is gaining the respect of critics and readers alike, regularly appearing on shortlists for major literary awards and on bestseller lists around the world.

Joseph Bologna, R. I. P.

The New York Times: Joseph Bologna, who looked like the quintessential tough guy but couldn’t seem to resist writing and playing sensitive male characters who longed for love and commitment in films like “Lovers and Other Strangers” and “Made for Each Other,” died on Sunday in Duarte, Calif., near Pasadena. He was 82.  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

PaperBack



Anthony Scott, Ten Toes Up, Exotic Novel, 1951

Treasure Hunters Who Met An Untimely Fate

Top 10 Treasure Hunters Who Met An Untimely Fate

One of the Most Reprinted English Books Ever

This Obscure Fishing Book is One of the Most Reprinted English Books Ever

Forgotten Hits: August 14th

Forgotten Hits: August 14th

A SuperChart, with commentary.

In that case, sir, you are free to go

Police: Man destroys liquor store construction site, blames 'hookah-smoking caterpillar'   

Hat tip to Lawrence Person.

The Great 78 Project

The Great 78 Project: The Internet Archive has a project going in an attempt to save as many old sound recordings as possible. These are songs recorded on 78 rpm records made between 1898 and the 1950s, when 33 and 45 rpm records replaced them.

Sunday, August 13, 2017

Samaritans -- Jonathan Lynn

Samaritans is a sad, scary, and very funny book about healthcare in America.  Samaritans is a hospital in Washington, D.C., and it has plenty of problems.  It's losing money, and it's poorly managed.  So in desperation the board hires Max Green, a man with no experience in running a hospital, to be its new CEO.  Green has been managing a Las Vegas casino, and he's going to run Samaritans like a business.  He plans for the hospital, and for himself, to make money.  Lots and lots of money.

How's he going to do that?  To start with he's going to hire superstar doctors.  To pay them, he'll have to cut costs elsewhere, but who cares about people in the low-paying jobs?  It's the Big Names that count.  This is just the first of many bad (but good for Green and the bottom line) ideas, another of which is that patients are just customers.   They have to pay for what they get.  As Green puts it,  “People can’t have what they can’t afford.  That’s what got America into this economic mess – people wanting something for nothing."
   
Things go pretty well at first, but eventually the luck runs out, and Green's schemes and corner-cutting begin to catch up with him.  Green has to resort to, well, you can't really call it murder, can you?  

You'll laugh a lot when you read Samaritans, but it will be a hollow laughter because you'll realize that what you're reading is all too possible.  This is satire with a real bite.  Check it out.

The Beatles' First #1 Song

The Beatles' First #1 Song: The Beatles' first record "Love Me Do" was released on October 5, 1962. It was a moderate success, peaking at #17 on the national music charts. Now, the band needed a good, strong follow-up song. "Please Please Me" was written entirely by John Lennon.

Song of the Day

(22) Johnny Cash - Sunday Morning Coming Down - YouTube:

The Planting of Judge Roy Bean

The Planting of Judge Roy Bean: Some of the legends are true.

Today's Vintage Ad


How a German Mathematician Took Responsibility for an Ancient Peruvian Artifact

How a German Mathematician Took Responsibility for an Ancient Peruvian Artifact: Maria Reiche lived in a shack in the desert with the Nazca Lines for 40 years

PaperBack



Luther Gordon, Any Man's Girl, Exotic Novel, 1949

Elvis Presley, 40 years after his death, remains an icon and a cautionary tale

Elvis Presley, 40 years after his death, remains an icon and a cautionary tale 

10 Rare Recently Discovered Religious Artifacts

10 Rare Recently Discovered Religious Artifacts

When London Bridge Moved … to Arizona?

When London Bridge Moved … to Arizona? 

Saturday, August 12, 2017

Kirk Hammett’s Movie Poster Collection

Peer Into the Horror That Is Kirk Hammett’s Movie Poster Collection

Song of the Day

(22) Kim Carnes - Bette Davis Eyes (HQ) - YouTube:

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

Best Dystopian Books: 100 Great Works OF Dystopian Fiction Tales about a world gone wrong.

Today's Vintage Ad


12 Seductive Facts About ‘The Graduate’

12 Seductive Facts About ‘The Graduate’ 

PaperBack



Jack Hanley, Very Private Secretary, Intimate Novel, 1952

But Not by Readers of This Blog

11 Popular Quotes Commonly Misattributed to F. Scott Fitzgerald

On the Rise of Scandinavian Crime Fiction

On the Rise of Scandinavian Crime Fiction

Blanche Blackwell, R. I. P.

The Washington Post: Blanche Blackwell inspired one of Noel Coward’s plays about an upper-crust love triangle, and swashbuckling Hollywood star Errol Flynn wanted to marry her. She was a member of one of Jamaica’s richest families, but she was best known as the mistress and muse of Ian Fleming, the rakish author who was the creator of James Bond.

Ken Kaiser, R. I. P.

The New York Times: Ken Kaiser, a no-nonsense umpire who was unafraid over his colorful 23-year major league career to confront players and managers, but who lost his job during a misguided labor action by his union, died on Tuesday in Rochester. He was 72.  

Hat tip to Jeff Meyerson.

Philippa Gregory: By the Book

Philippa Gregory: By the Book: The author of “The Last Tudor” is no fan of “sloppy genre novels”: “The typing alone is so exhausting — surely if you’re going to undertake 150,000 words, you might as well have something interesting to say?”