Thursday, November 09, 2017

15 Children's Books No One Reads Now

15 Children's Books No One Reads Now 

8 comments:

R. K. Robinson said...

No loss except the Milne, which is wonderful and should be on every young child's bookshelf.

Mike Stamm said...

I've read LITTLE BLACK SAMBO--although in the version I had, the child was illustrated as being from India, and the title may not (I can't remember) have referred to him as black. I still have my father's copy of PINOCCHIO, which made a deep and not entirely favorable impression on me when I was 8 or 9. It seems to be an example of "this is what happens to children when they don't behave" literature, along the lines of "Scared Straight." Definitely memorable, but--like much other children's literature of that era--not something I would give to a young child.

Off-topic, but perhaps of related interest: some years ago I found a battered, undated copy of the story of Aladdin, set in China, which was reflected in the illustrations--although the characters' names were still Arab.

Bill Crider said...

I've read 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, and 8, plus a bunch of Hardy Boys books.

Steve Oerkfitz said...

Read a few Hardy Boys as a kid. Always hated Milne. No loss there.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Jackie said she did teach CADDIE WOODLAWN. Of course I've read the Hardy Boys. Also Dick and Jane and Little Black Sambo, 60 years ago.

Art Scott said...

For some reason I remember that our beginner school readers were not about Dick, Jane & Spot, but Jerry, Alice & Jip. Between that & Dr Dolittle (which wasn't coursework, I discovered those in the library) I draw a blank, except for Paddle-to-the-Sea, which I suspect is still a staple for kids in Great Lakes states. A few Hardy Boys, but ditched those when I discovered Sherlock Holmes, and from there that was it for kids books.

Bill Crider said...

I remember "Paddle to the Sea,". Hadn't thought about that one in years.

Art Scott said...

That's one I wouldn't mind revisiting. Diane Kelley said she taught it in school. Though I'm kinda surprised you encountered it in Texas, long way from the Great Lakes. Still in print apparently, published in 1941.