Sunday, February 21, 2016

PaperBack



Eunice Mays Boyd, Murder Wears Mukluks, Dell, 1948

14 comments:

Deb said...

I never knew what mukluks were until today.

Bill Crider said...

This is an educational blog.

Don Coffin said...

Amazingly, I found 14 copies of this available (through ABE), at prices ranging from $4 to around $$0 (this for a first edition hardcover with dustjacket).

Bill Crider said...

Such a deal!

Daniel Stumpf said...

I actually read this and found it unbearably dull--but I just can't make myself throw out a book called MURDER WEARS MUKLUKS.

Richard Moore said...

I'll add one of my Facebook comments here as Dan should know that Anthony Boucher agreed with his view of the novel:


Boucher reviewed all three Boyd novels in his weekly San Francisco column with mild, qualified praise for the first. For the second, he wrote "Mrs. Boyd has a pleasing detective, and virgin territory which she describes well; an editor who would blue pencil her endless padding, and discipline her guess work solutions could easily push her into the front rank." Alas by the third in the series, which is the one pictured here, Boucher seems to have given up. "Timid Fairbanks grocer finds in perverse order a ghost, a corpse and a murderer. Full of Alaskan local color and as endless as a northern night."

Jerry House said...

And Boucher collaborated with Boyd and ten other members of a California chapter of MWA to write the novel THE MARBLE FOREST as by "Theo Durrant." The book was the basis for the movie MACABRE.

Richard Moore said...

Yes, I noted that in another FB comment. I guess I need to pick one or the other in the future for Bill's items which appear both on his blog and FB. The movie was directed by William Castle, then best known for his promotional gimmicks.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

This was an Ellen Nehr book, as I remember it.

Bill Crider said...

That's my memory as well, Jeff.

George said...

Another DELL Mapback I've never seen before.

Kent Morgan said...

Anybody on here ever wear mukluks? I have a beaded pair in my garage that I have owned since they were made specially for me when I was growing up in The Pas, Manitoba. Certainly kept your feet warm in below zero weather. You put a felt insole inside and wore about three pairs of sox.

Bill Crider said...

I suspect some people here have worn imitation mukluks. You might be the only one who's had the real thing.

Todd Mason said...

Not quite...but I might be the only reader/commenter who was born in Fairbanks, which made things more likely. And you Contiguans stay out of my umiak!