Monday, March 20, 2017

I'm Sure You'll All Agree

Top 10 novels on rural America  

I've read only the two obvious ones.

8 comments:

George said...

I read three--the two obvious ones and the Alice Munro. I also have a copy of the Maxwell but it's buried in book stack that I won't get to for years.

Rick Ollerman said...

Same here but I'd like to read Maxwell. I think I either have him in a Library of Ameerica edition or he's supposed to be forthcoming from them or something. I'm addled after the weekend. Sadly there's another one coming.

Hope you're doing well....

Deb said...

Two for me also--and, I assume, the same two (Faulkner and Steinbeck).

Rick Robinson said...

Just the two.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

Same

Gerard said...

0 for 10.

Don Coffin said...

I suspect I've read the same 2.

I thought Ken Kesey's Sometimes a Great Notion was a fine book. I also liked John NIchols' The Milagro Beanfield War, although it's not great. Thomas Pynchon's Mason and Dixon is maybe more historical than rural, but there's not much city life in it. A bet a lot of people would at least think about Gone With the Wind. Would anyone consider To Kill a Mockingbird a "rural" novel? It's certainly not a "city" novel. And Faulkner comes to mind.

And I wonder how it's possible to leave off a couple of books by Mark Twain...unless somehow those aren't considered "rural."

Bill Crider said...

I liked the Kesey a lot. Twain sure seems rural to me.