Thursday, October 20, 2016

How Chuck Berry Became the Greatest Rock ’n’ Roll Artist of a Generation

How Chuck Berry Became the Greatest Rock ’n’ Roll Artist of a Generation 

5 comments:

Richard Robinson said...

I don't think he was.

Don Coffin said...

I've always liked Chuck Berry, but in many ways he was just very good, not great. His lyrics are not always wonderful, and sometimes the music seemed pretty much recycled. But still a great listening experience.

Jeffrey Meyerson said...

And a number of the Founding Fathers (so to speak) of the rock & roll erase are still around, at least big names like Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Little Richard, and Jerry Lee Lewis. Also (a couple of years later) Dion, who is still not only performing but writing and recording. And Pat Boone, if you count him.

Steve Oerkfitz said...

Jeff-still find Berry better than the others you list and he has a much larger catalog. Not to take away from them. They are still very good. Jerry Lee Lewis did much more country than rock and roll.
It would be insulting to count Pat Boone. That would be like talking about Freddy and the Dreamers in conjunction with the Beatles, Stones and Dylan.

Anders E said...

Sorry, but the greatest of that generation was without question Little Richard. Berry was fine, however. A few duds ("Maybelline" sounds like polka to my ears) but "Almost Grown" is an incredibly great coming-of-age story told in about 140 seconds, including two instrumental breaks.

Greatest album by one of "the founding fathers" would be "Live at the Star Club" by Jerry Lee Lewis, recorded in 1964. Beyond insane. JLL was obviously inspired by that fine German cocktail "Schnapps und Preludin".