Monday, February 20, 2006

A Letter from William Faulkner

ABC News: William Faulkner letter auctioned for $18,000: "Feb 19, 2006 — LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - A letter by author William Faulkner complaining about a screenwriting contract with a Hollywood studio sold today for nearly $18,000, according to auction house Bonhams & Butterfields.

The two-page, typed letter was written by the Nobel prize-winning author of 'A Fable' and 'Soldiers' Pay' to his agent in August, 1943."

You know what's interesting to me? It's the two novels they chose to associate with Faulkner's name. I mean, if you were going to come up with the titles of two Faulkner novels, would those be the ones?

Of course the price for the letter makes me wonder how much mine are worth.

Okay, I just got off the phone with Bonham & Butterfields. They told me mine are worth four cents each, if the stamps haven't been canceled.

4 comments:

Lonnie Cruse said...

Waaaaait! The price of stamps just went up. Somebody's trying to cheat you. Need an agent to sell your letters?

Lonnie/who has quite a few grocery lists for sale.

Ruthie Black naked said...

Since I've met WILLIAM FAULKNER, all his "Gen-Next" groupies want me to tell of his "vibe." Well in 1963, he was kind of washed-out, with pale cheeks and white moustache & hair - - thickly white, but combed, buzzed, manicured. No five o'clock shadow on him. Washed out and wrinkled khaki linen 3-piece with pockets full of 'bacco and a corn cob, stained dark as mahogany. His eyes were nothing when he talked - - flat and hard as steel. But when he listened, they were frightening. Deep - - yes, cavernous - - no, deep like jewels, with points that pierced you and disected your thought before you spoke 'em. I stammered, stuttered, and clipped off my replies to him. He noticed my nervousness, looked away and whispered "I'm sorry." That was the part of him I liked, the gentility.
www.ruthieblacknaked.blogspot.com

Bill Crider said...

Great comment, Ruthie. Thanks.

Bill Crider said...

P.S. You're the only commenter I know who's met very famous southern writer who ever lived.